Oregon Live

In the furious effort to help students catch up in reading and math after two-plus years of pandemic upheaval, states around the country are zeroing in on a particular strategy: frequent, individualized tutoring. But not Oregon.

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Regular tutoring can help students catch up post-pandemic, but it’s slow to roll out in Oregon

Holding tutoring before school ran the risk of kids oversleeping or busy caregivers not getting there in time, she says; after school, many kids peel off for other activities or are simply spent after the school day.

Virtual tutoring programs like the Ignite! Reading one in use at Durham are gaining in popularity, particularly given a tight job market in the Portland area as well as in the more rural corners of the state, which have long struggled to hire and keep educators. A virtual program should include a live, trained tutor on the other side of the camera, McEachin says. Chat-based, self-paced-and-monitored programs can leave students disengaged and frustrated, he says.

“If the system isn’t ready to serve all children, then let’s bring in a safety net that is going to make sure that they learn what they need to learn while we give the system time to catch up,” she said. 

From “Regular tutoring can help students catch up post-pandemic, but it’s slow to roll out in Oregon” Oregon Live, The Oregonian(November 2022)

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